Responding to the Digital Divide

Responding to the Digital Divide Responding to the Digital Divide

Working to enable information access for everyone

The rise of the 'information society' is accelerating.

SoftBank is providing opportunities to leverage new technologies
in order to create an environment where people can freely access information,
whatever their location or background.

Through initiatives to eliminate the digital divide,
SoftBank is aiming for a society where anyone can aspire to their dreams and goals.

Supporting youth with special needs

Magic Lamp Project

Since 2009 SoftBank and EDUAS have been working with the University of Tokyo Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology to jointly conduct the Magic Lamp Project, a case study project utilizing mobile device functions for children with special needs.

Participating schools receive loans of tablets and the personal robot Pepper*1 as the project explores the potential of ICT as a means of communication and recognition based on studies such as those in which children with difficulty in verbal communication were able to communicate with text on a mobile device display, or developed an understanding of the abstract concept of time and the meaning of “hold on a second” by studying a picture of a clock timer on a mobile device.

This research has generated substantial results, such as cases where children who found it difficult to communicate verbally with others in words becoming able to better express their feelings and desires in their own words through conversing with and programming Pepper.

Through the use of ICT, children are able to do things that they previously could not, raising their level of motivation. We intend to expand our activities to enable children to discover even more of their inherent capabilities.

As an educational initiative for children with special needs, the Magic Lamp Project has received high praise.

[Note]
  1. *1
    Provided at no charge in connection with SoftBank Group Corp.'s Pepper Social Contribution Program.

About the name of the project

A mobile phone packed with various features that assist children with special needs to learn and participate in society can seem like a magical object, and this is where the Magic Lamp Project took its name.
The name Aki-chan (used in the Aki-chan's Magic Pocket and Aki-chan's Magic Pen Case projects) is taken from a real-life high-school student who had trouble communicating through speech. The project evolved through Aki-chan's use of electronic tools to communicate and is based on the actual experiences of Kenryu Nakamura, a professor at University of Tokyo Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology.

Learning support research initiatives using ICT

To date, we have collaborated with 430 special needs schools to promote initiatives to make students' studies and participation in society “barrier-free” by reporting and publishing case studies of the knowledge gained. The results of this project are available on the Magic Lamp Project website.

April 2018 launch of Magic Lamp Project 2018: Magic Diary

Over the year from April 2018 to March 2019 SoftBank has loaned tablets and the personal robot Pepper for use at educational and living facilities. in FY2018 our aim is to announce the results collected from guidance towards students' specific goals for their education and growth. The Magic Diary project name incorporates our wish that students continue to receive support and consideration through practical research based on activities such as these.

As part of this project we also hold Magic Lamp Project-certified regional Magic Teacher seminars for teachers at collaborating schools and the public, so that students with special needs can receive even higher quality and more meticulous support. Magic Teacher certifies teachers who understand how to utilize mobile device functions and apps to support the education and lives of students with special needs and are able to provide support that meets the educational needs of each student; 12 teachers have been certified to date.

Supporting the use of technology in teaching leadership to youth with special needs

DO-IT Japan

Since 2007, SoftBank has been supporting DO-IT (diversity, opportunities, internet working and technology) Japan (run by the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology) to help youth with special needs enter university and find employment.
This program supports students from elementary school through to university who have difficulty reading and writing, with the goal of enabling them to be future leaders in society.

Since 2011 together with EDUAS, an education business operator in the SoftBank Group, we have implemented programs using tablets and seminars for their parents to support learning.

SoftBank will continue to support communication for participants with special needs or suffering from illness, and to foster openness and diversity by identifying barriers in society.

Supporting hearing-impaired people's “Right to Know” through mobile phones

Supporting hearing-impaired people's “Right to Know” through mobile phones

SoftBank is examining how mobile phones and the Internet can help youth with special needs learn and gain independence. Since fiscal 2008, SoftBank has been lending mobile handsets to the non-profit organization (NPO) Nagano Summarize Center to help them develop an experimental system where interpreters in remote locations summarize the content spoken in public speeches in real time. This content is then displayed on a mobile phone. Through collaborations with universities and NPOs, SoftBank is committed to securing equal rights to information for the hearing impaired (“The Right to Know”)*2 through the expanded use of the Mobile Remote Information Assurance System.

[Note]
  1. *2
    Refers to the provision of information by alternative means to ensure equal rights to information.

Expanding the use of the Mobile Remote Information Relay System

Since fiscal 2009 we have conducted introductory experiments towards practical implementation of the Mobile Remote Information Assurance System jointly with universities, including the Tsukuba University of Technology, and NPOs. Since fiscal 2012, with the cooperation of partner universities and institutions, we have sought out universities that wish to be involved with long-distance information assurance, and conducted further experiments of the Mobile Remote Information Assurance System. The knowledge and experience we have gained will be published as a collection of case studies and manuals.

SoftBank is committed to expanding the use of the Mobile Remote Information Assurance System as a means of achieving widespread adoption of an effective long-distance information assurance service.

What is the Mobile Remote Information Assurance System?

The Mobile Remote Information Assurance System is a system derived from a business started by the NPO Nagano Summarize Center (in fiscal 2008) and developed and proof of concept tested by a joint research group consisting of the Tsukuba University of Technology, Softbank, NPO Nagano Summarize Center, Gunma University, The University of Tokyo Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, and MCC HubneT.
When a hearing-impaired person attends a class or other similar event, two interpreters working in concert summarize the speaker's words and add them in the form of captions on a PC screen. In a conventional system, interpreters use a networked PC, summarize the speech, and type captions on the PC screen. However, because the interpreters need to be present where the PC is located, there are constraints on the places and times the service can be used.
Under the new Mobile Remote Information Assurance System, the interpreters' summary of the speaker's words is entered on a mobile phone and displayed in real-time on other mobile phones. With this new system, interpreters no longer need to be physically present. They can also use the system while on the move, which widens the opportunities for the hearing impaired to obtain information.